Big thinkin'

~ Monday, June 11 ~
Permalink Tags: sociology economics education for-profits for profit colleges online college conferences academia higher education highered
3 notes
~ Thursday, June 7 ~
Permalink

Continued education is a noteworthy goal but it is not a cheap goal. Those certifications are often as expensive as a college degree and that doesn’t include the investment of time and other non-material resources (missing your kids, not caring for an elderly relative, sleep).

Paying for job training before you have the job is a tax. And it is a tax most likely to be paid by those least able to afford it. Certifications are, for many, a substitute for the cultural and social capital that higher class folks take for granted…and have free of charge. It’s poor, working class, lower status individuals who need most the miniscule edge a certificate provides in the job market because they don’t have friends in a position to give them “the hook up”.

Taxing the individual poor and working class for the possibility of a job that may or may not exist is not a structural solution to a structural problem. It’s a way to feel less guilty about a busted economy that is destined to leave most of us behind.

If the private sector wants a perfect employee they should train one.

Will people leave, flake out, prove to be bad investments sometimes? Absolutely. It’s a gamble but corporations are in the best position to absorb the risk. Individuals and the public sector are not. But, as financiers are constantly telling us, there is no reward without risk and the greater the risk the greater the reward. Let them buy their own rationalization and let us stop buying it. They can afford it. We cannot.

Colleges don’t work for the private sector and, increasingly, despite all of our credentials and certifications and skills and willingness, neither do millions of Americans. Stop blaming higher edcuation and workers for a bad economy that cannot absorb excess labor and start blaming the private sector for not investing in its own human capital. Anything other than a focus on those core issues is a distraction.

Tags: sociology economy economics certifications badges credentials labor education higher education college
3 notes
~ Wednesday, May 30 ~
Permalink Tags: academia higher education academe college sociology technology
19 notes
reblogged via friendsandfamilyround
~ Thursday, May 24 ~
Permalink Tags: sociology theory black black folks CP time
70 notes
reblogged via seanpadilla
~ Saturday, March 31 ~
Permalink

Concerning human development, we showed that while cognitive skills are
important in the economy and in predicting individual economic success,
the contribution of schooling to individual economic success could only partly
be explained by the cognitive development fostered in schools. We advanced
the position that schools prepare people for adult work rules, by socializing
people to function well,and without complaint, in the hierarchical structure
of the modern corporation.

Schools accomplish this by what we called the correspondence principle,
namely, by structuring social interactions and individual rewards to replicate
the environment of the workplace.

Schooling in Capitalist America Revisited - Bowles and Gintis (2001). (via alone-ontheeastcoast)

Bowles and Gintis for the MFing win. Them and Collins (and, of course, Bourdieu — always Bourdieu) compromise my entire theoretical framework.

Tags: schooling education sociology dissertating phd thesis theory
21 notes
reblogged via amajorinbeingmixedup
~ Thursday, March 22 ~
Permalink Tags: colorism black folks self-hatred white privilege light skin privilege data sociology cultural studies african american black
329 notes
reblogged via crunkfeministcollective
~ Friday, March 16 ~
Permalink
I grew up poor. I had little formal education. No real skills. I don’t work especially hard. Most of my ideas are either unoriginal or total crap. And yet, I walked right into a job for which I was ill-prepared, ill-suited and somebody else already had and I got it.If you ask me, that’s the American dream, right there. Anything can happen to anyone. It’s just random.

Nellie Bertram (character on The Office)

It’s a brilliant 8 seconds of television.

Tags: sociology division of labor work economics american way american exceptionalism organizational theory org theory
40 notes
reblogged via hypnoticleisure
~ Tuesday, February 28 ~
Permalink
longreads:

A writer goes undercover at a shipping warehouse in Mississippi—and wonders whether Americans will ever demand higher standards for how their Internet purchases are being fulfilled:

We will be fired if we say we just can’t or won’t get better, the workamper tells me. But so long as I resign myself to hearing how inadequate I am on a regular basis, I can keep this job. “Do you think this job has to be this terrible?” I ask the workamper.
“Oh, no,” she says, and makes a face at me like I’ve asked a stupid question, which I have. As if Amalgamated couldn’t bear to lose a fraction of a percent of profits by employing a few more than the absolute minimum of bodies they have to, or by storing the merchandise at halfway ergonomic heights and angles. But that would cost space, and space costs money, and money is not a thing customers could possibly be expected to hand over for this service without huffily taking their business elsewhere.

“I Was a Warehouse Wage Slave.” — Mac McClelland, Mother Jones
More McClelland: “I Can Find an Indicted Warlord. So Why Isn’t He in The Hague?” — Mother Jones, Sept. 28, 2011

longreads:

A writer goes undercover at a shipping warehouse in Mississippi—and wonders whether Americans will ever demand higher standards for how their Internet purchases are being fulfilled:

We will be fired if we say we just can’t or won’t get better, the workamper tells me. But so long as I resign myself to hearing how inadequate I am on a regular basis, I can keep this job. “Do you think this job has to be this terrible?” I ask the workamper.

“Oh, no,” she says, and makes a face at me like I’ve asked a stupid question, which I have. As if Amalgamated couldn’t bear to lose a fraction of a percent of profits by employing a few more than the absolute minimum of bodies they have to, or by storing the merchandise at halfway ergonomic heights and angles. But that would cost space, and space costs money, and money is not a thing customers could possibly be expected to hand over for this service without huffily taking their business elsewhere.

“I Was a Warehouse Wage Slave.” — Mac McClelland, Mother Jones

More McClelland: “I Can Find an Indicted Warlord. So Why Isn’t He in The Hague?” — Mother Jones, Sept. 28, 2011

Tags: sociology work writing
100 notes
reblogged via motherjones
~ Monday, February 6 ~
Permalink
politicalprof:

Job growth in past and current recessions. In case you had any questions about just how big a hole we had dug for ourselves.
h/t: Andrew Sullivan

politicalprof:

Job growth in past and current recessions. In case you had any questions about just how big a hole we had dug for ourselves.

h/t: Andrew Sullivan

Tags: sociology labor work economy
20 notes
reblogged via politicalprof
Permalink

Thatawkwardmomentwhen…

…the instant you open your eyes in the morning you realize exactly what you did wrong in your data entry. You are both happy to have figured it out (thanks subconscious!) and sad because you now have to go find the survey forms and match the gender variable up with each response item and you have no idea what you’re doing and the data is due in 5…4.75 hours. Oh. :(

Tags: sociology data so stupid arrrrrghhhhh
1 note